All About Negroamaro

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Pronunciations – NEH-groh-ah-MAH-ro

Negroamaro is a grape variety mostly associated with south Italy, more precisely the region of Apulia. The grape variety is native to this region and the center of production is Salento which is the heel of Italy. It is mostly known under the name of Negroamaro but there are also synonyms such as Abbruzzese, Amaro Nero and many more. When translated, the name actually means Black and Bitter. 

The wines produced from Negroamaro are usually very deep in intensity with purple or deep ruby red color in youth.

Negroamaro Tasting Notes

Primary Notes – Red fruit (Red cherry), Black fruit (Black Cherry, Black currant, Black Berry, Black Plum) 

Secondary Notes – Oak (Smoke, Cinnamon, Nutmeg, Vanilla) 

MLF (Butter, Cream) 

Tertiary Notes – With age it develops leather, tobacco, cedar, earth, meat. 

Body – Medium to full body

Palate – Sweetness – Dry; Acidity -Medium; Tannin – Medium to High; 

Typical ABV% – 13.5-15%

Negroamaro Styles 

Negroamaro is usually produced in two styles – Still dry red wine or still dry rose. It is sometimes used to produce spumante and frizzante wines although these are not often seen. 

When produced as a red wine it tends to have deep color with a medium to full body, lots of dark fruit aromas and almost often signs of oak aging. Oak aging allows for the wine to soften the tannins and get a rounder texture before bottling. It also imparts aromas to the wine, such as cloves, smoke, cinnamon, nutmeg and vanilla. 

When produced as a rosato or rose it has a characteristic pinkish color with red fruit aromas, most often red cherries, it is dry and it has a medium acidity. 

Negroamaro Classifications 

Most of the classifications for Negroamaro are found in southern Italy where the grape is most widely planted. The most well known DOC for Negroamaro is Salice Salentino, although there are many more. 

To mention some of them we have for red wines:
-Leverano Negroamaro Rosso DOC

-Salice Salentino Rosso Riserva DOC

-Brindisi Rosso DOC and Brindisi Rosso Riserva DOC

For Rose wines:
-Salice Salentino Rosato DOC

-Leverano Negroamaro Rosato DOC

-Brindisi Rosato DOC 

When To Drink Negroamaro 

Negroamaro is usually served with heavier dishes or those that have more sweeter flavors as they bring out the sweetness in the wine. It is quite nice to drink it in the winter time as well, especially around Christmas. It works well with barbeques and meat dishes. 

Since it is a medium to full bodied red wine, serve it between 15 – 18 degrees celsius (60-64 fahrenheit) 

Best Years To Drink Negroamaro

Since Negroamaro is a rich, tannic red with a good acidity level and a medium to full body, it means that it has a good aging potential. With age, red wines tend to lose color and tannins tend to soften. Acidity also goes down and the body of the wine gets lighter. Negroamaro can be aged more or less up to 10 years depending on the producer. When young it will show ripe fruit aromas with lots of color and intensity. However when it ages, it will develop tertiary aromas which give the wine a lot of complexity and a layered mouthfeel. 

Flavors that develop with age in red wine tend to be leather, earth, forest floor, meat, cedar, tobacco, coffee, chocolate and many more. Fruit tends to move away from ripe flavors into more dried flavors. 

Negroamaro Average Prices

Negroamaro is somewhat considered to be an affordable wine with the average price being 21$.
However this depends as well on the producer and where you are getting your wine. 

Negroamaro Nutrition Facts

A glass of Negroamaro tends to have about 125 calories and about 4 grams of carbs.
One thing is for sure, if you have enough of them, you won’t be thinking about the calories anymore. 

Fun Facts About Negroamaro

Negroamaro is thought to be introduced to the region by the Greeks when they conquered it in the 8th century BC. Some say that it was the Illyrians who brought it before them. 

The name Negroamaro means Black and Bitter, however it is thought that the amaro part was derived from the Greek word “mavrud” meaning black.